Coaching in the Game

two hands_smallRapport Leadership International uses learning processes so its students gain a deeper understanding of the lesson, and takeaway profound and impactful learnings that encourage a change in behavior.

Below is a process called “Coaching in the Game” which you can use to help demonstrate feedback.

Purpose:

Demonstrate the importance that giving and receiving feedback have on the outcome and performance of an organization.

 Background: 

Often we have one-way communication in business. As leaders, we may be guilty of this when we just tell people what to do or wait until the annual performance review to let employees know how their performance measures up. As employees, we may avoid asking for information on how we can improve our performance and we shy away from closed-door meetings with our supervisor. A core element of every business, and every relationship, must be two-way communication. When we take the time to share information, provide feedback and allow time for response and discussion we show that we care about each others success and the success of our organization.

To get maximum impact, feedback and communication must happen as close to the event as possible. Coaching in the Game will help you and your team experience the power of immediate feedback on the results you get.

Set Up:

Divide the participants into groups of three and assign the following roles per each group:

1 Coach, 2 Players

Process:

Step One:

Share the objective of the process with all participants.

The objective is to touch hands as many times as possible within a 10 second period while spinning around clockwise.

Explain that they will be given four opportunities to reach their highest score.

Step Two:

Ask Players to stand facing each other approximately three feet apart

Have the Coach stand nearby – close enough to see what they are doing and still out of the way

Have the Players to extend one arm out to the side, with palm face out.

 Round One:

  • Facilitator sets timer and starts the round.
  • Players close their eyes and spin in clockwise direction with arm outstretched.
  • Coach stands silently and watches.
  • Facilitator calls “Time” after 10 seconds.
  • Players count how many times they were able to touch hands.

Round Two:

Let the Coaches know they will be providing feedback at the end of this round on what they see during the process and what the players can do differently to better meet the goal.

  • Facilitator sets timer and starts the round.
  • Players close their eyes and spin in clockwise direction with arm outstretched.
  • Coach stands silently and watches.
  • Timer calls “Time” after 10 seconds.
  • Players count how many times they were able to touch hands.
  • Coach explains what he saw and shares with the players what they can do differently to ensure they are able to touch hands

Round Three:

Allow the Players to apply the feedback they have just received at the end of round two.

  • Facilitator sets timer and starts the round.
  • Players close their eyes and spin in clockwise direction with arm outstretched.
  • Coach stands silently and watches.
  • Timer calls “Time” after 10 seconds.
  • Players count how many times they were able to touch hands.

Round Four:

This time the Coach will be interacting with the Players and giving them feedback during the process.

  • Facilitator sets timer and starts the round.
  • Players close their eyes and spin in clockwise direction with arm outstretched.
  • Coach interacts with the players and lets them know what they can do to ensure their hands touch as they are spinning.
  • Timer calls “Time” after 10 seconds.
  • Players count how many times they were able to touch hands.

Step Three:

Ask participants to gather round for a group discussion. Have them arrange their chairs in a circle or, if a larger group, into a horseshow. Debrief the process using the following questions:

  • In which round were you the most successful in reaching the objective? Why?
  • What did you experience during round one? How did it feel to watch people working at something and missing the goal? How did it feel to know someone was watching and not providing input?
  • What did you experience during round two? How did it feel to receive feedback after the round was over? How well was the feedback applied during round three?
  • What did you experience during round four? How did it feel to receive feedback as you were working to achieve the objective? 
  • What impact did “Coaching in the Game” have on the results?
  • How does feedback and coaching show up in your organization?  When is it given?  How is it given?  How does it feel to give feedback?  How does it feel to be the receiver of feedback?
  • In what areas of our business can we apply the insights from this process?
  • What steps can you take based on the insights you gained in this exercise to be more open to asking for feedback and giving feedback in order to improve your performance and the performance of those around you?

Conclusion:

Feedback and coaching can only be half effective if it is not delivered in a timely manner. In order to maximize our communication and our personal effectiveness as leaders we must be willing to “Coach in the Game” by providing feedback as close to the event as possible.

To increase your influence and demonstrate even greater leadership actively seek the feedback of everyone in your organization and willingly provide feedback to them:

  1. Your leader
  2. Your peers and associates
  3. Your team
  4. Your customers

Growth occurs when there is Feedback!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>